The 10 best tips to keep your new car – A car with a well-maintained paint will always look younger than a car with scratches and scratches.

Some are obsessed with car maintenance, parking in places far away from where they need to be, so that other inconsiderate owners do not open their doors to yours, or carefully removing every little mark as soon as it appears.

But even these people often make the most basic mistakes when it comes to keeping their car as new.

So, here’s what NOT to do to your own car.

The 10 best tips to keep your new car

1. Use an automated car wash with swirling brushes.

Note that these brushes are called “swirling” brushes and that’s exactly what they will do to your painting. Even if you do not notice it, you’ve probably added a lot of new spiral marks to your painting.

These brushes in car washes are rarely cleaned, so sand, chippings and other accumulated debris are sprayed onto your paint every time the brush passes overhead. Some car washes use synthetic brushes that better remove dirt and debris, but this is not a back-up solution.

2. Go to a car wash where attendants dry your car.

If there are people who hand-dry your car after it has been car-washed, it can be almost as bad as using a brush car wash, because there are chances that towels they use were not washed.

Drying your car with a dirty towel only swirls the sand of other cars around your painting. Naughty.

3. Use a high-pressure, non-contact car wash.

So you think that bringing your car into a self-service dishwasher or high-pressure non-contact will protect your painting? It’s still wrong. If your car is exceptionally dirty, hitting it with high-pressure water can throw debris through your paintwork and cause those awful swirl marks.

Even though the car is relatively clean, you are not safe. Many car washes use recycled water and no matter how hard they try or what they tell you, it’s not possible to remove all the contaminants, so every drop of high-pressure water is effectively sandblasting your paint.

Another problem with these car washes is that they can use a greater concentration of detergent that will quickly remove the wax you have applied so carefully (you apply the wax, do not you?).

And as if that were not enough, contactless car washes do not even remove all the dirt from your car. Look closely and you will see a thin film of dirt on the surface after washing. If you still decide to use a non-contact self-service car wash, always start with a high-pressure rinse and, before driving it to your car, run it for at least 20 seconds against the wall to eliminate aggressive chemicals that remain in the pipes.

4. Leave the bird droppings on the car until the next wash.

Birds must have a bad sense of humor, because no matter how far from a tree you park, one of the small insects will let fly and leave a deposit on your painting.

The likelihood of this happening is directly proportional to the date you washed the car. Bird droppings contain acid that can damage the surface of the paint.

It’s even worse under direct sunlight. The best advice is to wash your car’s bird droppings as soon as possible – the longer it stays there, the more damage it can do.

5. Do not wash your car because “it will only get dirty again”.

There is a feeling of inevitability, especially in winter, that as soon as you wash your car, it will rain and annul all your good work.

However, the longer dirt and dirt remain on your paint, the more damage it can do, so cleaning it up, even if the car may get dirty again, is a good preventative practice.

6. Sit well behind the vehicle in front of you.

Some people seem to enjoy sitting as close as possible to the vehicle in front of them.

Not only is it a stupid and dangerous practice, but it also stings your car with debris. For every rattling you hear on the hood or windshield, there are probably three others that are aimed at your body, grille, headlights, bumpers and other vulnerable parts.

 

7. Find a parking space near a highway or in an industrial area.

We all know how difficult it can be to find a convenient parking spot, but do not be tempted to park near a highway, railway or heavy industrial area.

While dark colored cars are sensitive to vortex marks, cars with lighter colored paint are affected by dust and other fallout that falls from above.

What appears to be tiny rust stains in your painting is actually microscopic pieces of metal and other pollutants released into the atmosphere by the brakes of cars and trains. They stay there unnoticed until they bloom like tiny rust spots all over your painting.

Cached early, they can often be wiped, but once they are well established, you’ll need a clay bar or even an acid wash to get rid of them.

8. Brake hard and often.

It’s another stupid behavior that increases the risk of someone stomping on you, but also creates more brake dust residue to get on your own car.

Not only will you need to replace the brake pads and rotors more often, but you will also need to have your car repaired to preserve the finish.

9. Leave the ice and snow on the car – it will eventually fall.

It may not be a problem that affects too many Australian drivers, but ice, frost, and snow sometimes cover the roof, windshield, boot and hood.

Although ice and snow do not scratch the paint as they slide over, dirt and debris under the paint do. Carefully remove ice, snow or frost, or wait until they melt before leaving.

10. Do not bother waxing your car twice a year.

Wax is a protective coating for your paint and breaks down over time. It must be applied every year before winter and again before the summer. Use a reputable brand, apply it in the shade and take your time.

Do you see? Giving your car that unloved patina is not that difficult. But if you follow this relatively simple advice, you will be able to keep your precious painting as if it were new. And in addition to the satisfaction of owning and driving a smart car, you’ll benefit when it’s time to trade or sell it to an individual.